Shark senses

Sharks have more senses than we do for instance sharks have electric sensors in their nose to detect electric pulses from other organisms in the water. They also have pressure sensors which can pick up the movement of a wounded fish. They do have the same senses that we humans have as well.

The pressure sensors that sharks have are called the lateral line which is very similar to how we humans can sense airflow. One of the sharks most known senses is how good of smell they have. Marine Biologists have tested this by using odor plumes. The biologists have tested the odor plumes on the dog shark but it could find the source of the odor without using its sight and its lateral line which is called the olfactory system.

Some experimental scientists were drawing in sharks to test how sharks can sense electric fields in the water. These electric fields come from the cells an animal. They haven’t found out what this sense is exactly used but they continue to experiment on the sharks.

Many people know that the shark has a well-constructed sense of smell due to the fact that it can smell blood from a mile away. But not many people know that the area around the nostrils have a sort of whisker called barbels. These are used for a sense of touch to feels the food. Hey, here’s some fun facts Sharks can see in color, but they are more sensitive to light than color.

Since sharks have all these extra senses and more adapted senses than humans do, they are unique animals. There are many different types of sharks who all have these different senses as well as the same type many sharks today have been evolved from a gigantic shark called Megalodon. This was the largest shark and fed on prehistoric whales modern scientists say that the megalodon was the ancestor to the Great White Shark and is often pictured looking like the Great White.  The Megalodon had jaws that when opened could measure six feet wide to seven feet high, that means that it could easily eaten the large prehistoric whales. People always think that sharks touch by using their nose, that’s not true it’s their teeth that are their fingers. That’s one reason why people are bitten by sharks.

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Now sharks have gotten these senses by evolution, how many more fine-tuned senses could appear in the future?

Scientists keep wondering if the Megalodon is still alive and living in the Gulf of California.  No one is sure if it can still be down their now the question is, is it still alive?

Most animals that evolve are smaller than their ancestors, so will that continue with modern sharks to future sharks?

5 thoughts on “Shark senses

  1. This blog appealed to me because sharks are a cool animal. They scare me also so I would like to get to know more about their senses! Your blog had great information and was very well put together. I also liked your picture you included; it was helpful in describing things to me. I wanted to just further research the senses of a shark. Sharks have a pair of nares, nostril-like holes that are located just under the leading edge of the snout. Each nare is divided by a nasal flap into two openings. This allows them to register smell. Many sharks depend heavily on their vision whilst hunting although there are occasions where the eyes play little or no role at all such as when a hammerhead is searching for a stingray which is completely buried. Touch, many sharks will nose an object prior to biting it in an effort to establish its edibility. I learned more about sharks!
    http://www.elasmodiver.com/shark_senses.htm

  2. This blog appealed to me because sharks are a cool animal. They scare me also so I would like to get to know more about their senses! Your blog had great information and was very well put together. I also liked your picture you included; it was helpful in describing things to me. I wanted to just further research the senses of a shark. Sharks have a pair of nares, nostril-like holes that are located just under the leading edge of the snout. Each nare is divided by a nasal flap into two openings. This allows them to register smell. Many sharks depend heavily on their vision whilst hunting although there are occasions where the eyes play little or no role at all such as when a hammerhead is searching for a stingray which is completely buried. Touch, many sharks will nose an object prior to biting it in an effort to establish its edibility. I learned more about sharks!

    http://www.elasmodiver.com/shark_senses.htm

  3. This is an interesting blog because a lot of people do not know much about sharks. I learned very much about their senses and what they can do. It is impressive that they can sense electrical impulses through their noses. It is also interesting that they have evolved over time and have developed such advanced senses that are many times better than humans. Here is a site on shark senses.

    http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/sharks/anatomy/Senses.shtml

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