Put Down that Soda and Pick Up some Water

type-2-diabetes

A few years ago it was really rare to find type 2 diabetes in children. My friend has diabetes. She got them in 1st grade. She has type 1, that occurs in most children to have type 1 not type 2. According to the CDC more than 186,000 people younger than 20 have both type 1 and type 2diabetes. Another name for type to diabetes is Mellitus.

In adults mellitus is the digestive system breaking down carbohydrates into blood sugar glucose. The pancreas creates a hormone called insulin. This leads glucose from the blood vessels into your body cells. In children mellitus are resistant to the effects of insulin and glucose builds up in the blood stream. That will eventually cause glucose to reach a high level in the body.

Some risk factors in type 2 diabetes for children are being overweight; people from your family might have it, usually female and specific ethnic groups. Another risk factor is other problems with the insulin. Most children with type 2 diabetes are diagnosed when they hit puberty and a developed stage with increased resistance. A few symptoms of type 2 diabetes are increased thirst, fatigue, weight loss, blurred vision, and slow healing wounds.

In addition, with adults the type 2 diabetes in children appears to be associated with excess abdominal weight. The symptoms for adults are faster than children. For adults the symptoms are dry mouth, blurred vision, frequent urination, itchy skin, heavy breathing and numbness or tingling in their hands or feet. Their blood stream gets thick and syrupy from the extra sugar in their body. The entire genes together still only account for 10%.

Some other causes of type 2 diabetes are from genes. Each being a small contributor to and increased probability. If you have an identical twin and one twin has diabetes the chances are the other one will have a lifetime greater than 90%. Nonidentical siblings have a 25-50%. Since 2011 about 36 genes have been found that contribute the risk of mellitus.

All in all, if you have type mellitus, your insulin resistance is important. Your body is said to resist insulin because it no longer responds chemically to the hormones. If you get symptoms for type 2, you will have a number of lifestyle factors. There are a number of medications and other health problems that can predispose to diabetes. Some people with insulin don’t develop diabetes. People with diabetes do need the insulin to survive.

1)  Why do you need insulin in your body?

2) What  are some risk factors in Mellitus?

3) Can you be born with type 2 diabetes?

11 thoughts on “Put Down that Soda and Pick Up some Water

  1. This was a great article about diabetes. But all i know about it is that Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy.
    The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies.When you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use its own insulin as well as it should.This causes sugars to build up in the blood. Thank you once again biology and health class for helping me put the pieces together when it comes to diabetes. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/info/diabetes/

  2. This article had a lot of information. I didn’t know that symptoms of type 2 diabetes occurred faster in adults than children. I learned from the article that becoming over weight can result with type 2 diabetes if you are a child. The fact that interested me the most was that most children get diagnosed with diabetes when they hit puberty. All in all, this article did explained how diabetes occurs in children and adults and it informed me more about diabetes. Here is a site that I found some more information about diabetes.

    http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/type-2-diabetes

  3. I think that this article was well thought out and very informal. Following the questions you left… We need insulin in our body because it allows glucose to enter all the cells of your body and be used as energy. With diabetes, your body doesn’t make as much insulin so the glucose sticks in your blood instead of moving into cells. Too much or too little insulin in your body can cause major health issues.
    People who have history of diabetes mellitus, age, obesity, and physical inactivity are at the highest rate of being diagnosed with it. Also, people with poor dietary and exercise habits also have the risk of getting type 2 Diabetes mellitus.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11800065

    http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/diabetes/treatment/insulin-therapy.html

  4. I thought this article was interesting. I thought It was crazy that so many kids get diabetes. I also think that the article title is on Point. It completely makes sense and I think it fits well with this blog. I read in another article that kids do not usually get type 2 diabetes when they are born but they can later develop it. kids can be born with type 1 diabetes and I read that it can later develop into type 2 diabetes. I really thought this article was good and it contained a lot of information.
    http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/parents-and-kids/

  5. I agree that insulin is very important for the body. I also agree that Type 2 diabetes is becoming increasingly more popular in the US. You need insulin in your body to break up glucose. If you do not have enough insulin in your body it is called insulin resistance. Insulin resistance can cause a heart attack, stroke, dehydration, and can fall into a Diabetic Coma. A Diabetic Coma is caused when a Person with Type 2 Diabetes is severely ill and they are not able to drink the amount of fluids to make up for fluid losses.
    http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/type-2-diabetes

  6. I found this article very interesting for a number of reasons. The first reason was the fact that I didn’t know much about type two diabetes, or mellitus. I also found it interesting about the statistics with the twins. I didn’t know that if you were an identical twin you have a 90% chance on contracting whatever your twin has, and vice versa. One thing that puts me off about this article is that the title doesn’t fit properly. It says to put down the soda, however it barely mentions nutrition and how it affects a person with diabetes.

    To answer the three questions that you left at the end; you need insulin in your body because it regulates your blood sugar levels. Without insulin, you would die. There are many risk factors when it comes to diabetes. One risk factor is your weight. The heavier you are, the more at risk you are for type two diabetes. Another risk factor is your race and heritage. Depending on your family history, you may be more at risk, or hardly at risk for type two diabetes. To answer the final question, you can only be born with type one diabetes, not type two diabetes. Depending on your lifestyle and you family heritage, you might develop type two diabetes later on, but you can’t be born with it.

    I found a link that explains everything needed to know about diabetes. It explains how that you need to not only exercise regularly, but you need to watch your diet as well. It tells you how if you don’t care about your eating habits, and your have diabetes, it can lead to serious health problems down the road.
    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/

  7. This article was very interesting to me because I also wrote about diabetes and it was really nice to see what we both learned about it. The title of this article made me want to read it because I drink soda and I was curious to what the blog was about. However The blog didn’t talk much about nutrition and how it plays a role in diabetes. Here’s a great site I used to find information on diet and diabetes. Hope it helps.
    http://www.helpguide.org/life/healthy_diet_diabetes.htm

  8. This is an interesting article. I did, however, know a few things about a topic such as this. Though, I did learn a few new things such as where diabetes is from and when most people are diagnosed. The answer to the first question is that insulin is needed to keep blood sugar levels steady. Hence why a diabetic has to take insulin.
    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabetes.html

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